BEYOND THE STAGE with Gare St Lazare Ireland: “Waiting for Godot”

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Gary Lydon (Vladimir) and Conor Lovett (Estragon).

On a country road, two friends wait for a man named Godot to arrive. Their comical efforts to pass the time parody the human condition, and the everyday language of their exchanges takes on a universal significance.

Gare St Lazare Ireland ranks among the foremost interpreters of Beckett’s work and will be performing Waiting for Godot at NYU Skirball October 13-17. The company consists of joint artistic directors Judy Hegarty Lovett and Conor Lovett (who also plays Estragon in this production), and associate producer Maura O’Keeffe. They have produced over 17 Beckett titles for the stage and performed in over 25 countries across six continents to great international acclaim. 

Explore
Artist’s Website: Gare St Lazare Ireland

Playwright’s Website: Samuel Beckett

Read 
Review: Waiting For Godot (Total Theatre Magazine)
“Director Judy Hegarty Lovett has many productions of Beckett under her belt with this company, and it bears their trademark purity of vision and economy of movement.” — Lisa Wolfe, Dublin Theatre Festival 2013

Review: There’s Hope and Futility in Waiting For Godot (Broadway World/Boston)
“The wonderful trick of the Gare St Lazare Players of Ireland’s mesmerizing production of Samuel Beckett’s classic Waiting for Godot is that it inspires hope even as it suggests life is hopeless.” — November 10, 2013

Review: Waiting for Godot — Dramatizing the Residue of Resilience (The Arts Fuse)
“What the Gare St Lazare Players Ireland bring to the work is its distinct connection to Ireland, Beckett’s ancestral home, which he abandoned…Thanks to this production, moving glimpses of the Old Sod itself flicker through the emptiness.” — Robert Israel, November 3, 2013

Article: Celebrating 60 years of Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot
Godot highlights what French novelist Alain Robbe-Grillet called ‘being there’. It has little plot beyond the fact of waiting for Godot, and little on stage to distract the two tramps, Estragon and Vladimir (or the audience) from their waiting.” — Anna McMullan January 4, 2013

Article: When Beckett wrote Waiting for Godot he really didn’t know a lot about theatre
“As Waiting for Godot turns 60, Beckett expert Anna McMullan explains why the play still appeals” — Interview by Daisy Bowie-Sell January 5, 2013

Article: ‘Very Unpromising Material’: A Review for Beckett’s Waiting For Godot, From 1955. A review for Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot from when the play first opened in England, at the Arts Theater Club, London, in August 1955.

Watch
Video Clip

Experience
Post-Show Discussion and Q&A October 13th
Join us directly after performance for a post-show discussion and Q&A with Tom Bishop, Professor of French and Comparative Literature and Director, Center for French Civilization and Culture at NYU, in conversation with artists from Gare St Lazare Ireland.

Post-Show Discussion and Q&A October 15th
Join us directly after performance for a post-show discussion and Q&A with Belinda McKeon, Irish novelist and playwright, in conversation with artists from Gare St Lazare Ireland.

Symposium October 16th, 2:00-6:00pm
Beckett’s “Waiting for Godot”: A Symposium

Co-presented by NYU Skirball Center, Glucksman Ireland House at NYU, and Gare St Lazare Ireland. Free to the public. Please RSVP by emailing ireland.house@nyu.edu.

Join us for a discussion with guests including Walter Asmus, Will Eno, Jonathan Kalb, Tom Cousineau, Conor Lovett and Judy Hegarty Lovett of Gare St Lazare Ireland, and more celebrated scholars in conversation about Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot in performance, politics, and the classroom.

Post-Show Discussion and Q&A October 16th
Join us directly after performance for a post-show discussion and Q&A with John Waters, Clinical Assistant Professor of Irish Studies; Director of Graduate and Undergraduate Irish Studies at NYU, in conversation with artists from Gare St Lazare Ireland.

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